The Qualification of Leadership

This is what the LORD Almighty says: I took you (David) from the pasture and from following the flock, to be ruler over my people Israel (1 Chron 17:7).

 The contrast between what men usually consider to be the qualifications for leadership and what God makes leaders from is startling.

 By the time this was spoken to David, he had long ago left the pasture and the sheep. He had been on the run from Saul for 10-12 years. That period of his life had ended with Saul’s death and then David had to create a government and stabilize the country politically. Before he and his army began to subdue the surrounding nations, David turned his attention from the urgent to the important – establishing the people in the worship of the God of Israel.

 While he was considering this matter, the thought occurred to him that he should establish a permanent dwelling place for the Ark of the Presence. While it was not something that God had necessarily intended, He was so pleased that David’s faith was not merely a way of securing the blessings and creature comforts of this life that He promised that David’s line would never fail.

 Men tend to look upon pedigree and physical prowess in leaders; God looks much deeper. God saw in David a man of loyalty, gratitude and faithfulness. He was conditioned by his willingness to humble himself and take care of his father’s sheep. By observing in David a concern for the helpless condition of the sheep God recognized that he would also be concerned for the helpless conditions of the people in his kingdom, a concern that God shared because those same people were made in His image.

 God might have chosen David because he persevered as he ran from Saul; He might have chosen him for his military genius; He might have chosen him for his faithfulness to His cause. Certainly He rewarded these qualities. But He chose Him to be king because of the mercy he displayed for the helpless and needy – the same cause He Himself is given to. For God Himself is described as “a father of the fatherless and a defender of widows” (Ps. 68:5, et.al.).

The Rich Man and Lazarus

“He answered, ‘Then I beg you, father, send Lazarus to my father’s house, for I have five brothers. Let him warn them, so that they will not also come to this place of torment.’

                “Abraham replied, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them listen to them.’

“‘No, father Abraham,’ he said, ‘but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’

                “He said to him, ‘If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.'” (Luke 16:27-31)

 

                The text here comes from the story about the rich man and Lazarus. (Traditionally, the rich man’s name has been “Divies” because it is the term used in the Vulgate, the Latin Bible, for the rich man, but the name is not in Scripture.) Lazarus was a poor beggar who often would sit at the gate of the rich man’s home and beg. But he believed (apparently) and was rewarded with heaven while the rich man suffered in Hades. Jewish legend suggested that when a believer died he would go to Abraham’s bosom, so Jesus was using this idea to make His point, not necessarily condoning any truth to the legend.

                The rich man, while in agony, called upon Father Abraham to soothe his agony by sending Lazarus and when that was not possible, he asked him to send Lazarus back to his family that was still living so that they could be warned. Abraham explained that they had the Scriptures, but the rich man thought that someone coming back to life would more clearly convince them. But Jesus put the main point of His story in the words of Abraham, “If they don’t listen to Moses and the Prophets, they won’t be convinced if someone rises from the dead.”

                There is a specific and a general application to this. The specific application is that the skeptical religious leaders would not be convinced when Jesus Himself rose from the dead. This is, at least in part, because to believe in Him would likely doom their careers within the Jewish Sanhedrin. These positions were acquired at great cost of time and effort. We might compare them to political careers in our day. Very few men are willing to risk their careers to believe in Jesus – then or now.

                The general application is that no matter how many or how stupendous the miracles, they will not convince the skeptic, unless they are convinced by the Scriptures. If a person will believe it will be because he chooses to listen to “Moses and the Prophets” (aka, the Scripture).

                This principle is really a major factor in the decline of the Church in our day. People have things backward – they want the miracles rather than the Scripture. It’s too hard and time-consuming for many to dig into the Scripture; we’d rather just have a quick, easy miracle, or some other “feel-good” entertainment. And there are always churches that will try to accommodate them. But Dr. A.B. Simpson had it right when he penned the verse, “Once it was the blessing, Now it is the Lord; Once it was the feeling, Now it is His Word; Once the gift I wanted, Now the Giver own; Once I sought for healing, Now Himself alone.”

The Storms of Life

24 “Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. 25 The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. 26 But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. 27 The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash.” (Matthew 7:24-27).

I have always been a person who searches for people with spiritual integrity – people whose lives match their professions of faith. In this famous parable, Jesus calls these people “wise” because they practice His teachings. Often these people are easy to spot – they look you in the eye when you speak to them, they speak openly of Christ’s activity in their daily lives and their speech is seasoned with a healthy understanding of the Scriptures.

It is also usually pretty easy to spot most of the “foolish” people of the parable. Christ has no place in their conversation; there is little overlap between their Sunday morning behavior and the rest of their week’s activities. If they go to any sort of worship service, it takes the form of rote prayers and music, along with a quickly-forgotten homily from the preacher.

But while most of the population is pretty easy to assess, there are some who are good “actors.” For these the trials of life – the rain and the winds of Jesus’ parable – draw out the true assessment of their spiritual lives. In another place Jesus told His audience that the “rain falls on the just and the unjust” (Matt. 5:45), in other words, upon all of us. How we respond determines what foundation our lives are built upon.

As a teacher I have often given my students “tests.” At least we called them “tests” publicly and for some they were. There were enough questions about whether they understood the material that they had to be tested. For others, though, they were more like “affirmations.” It was clear from my interaction in class that these students had a grasp of the material, and the examination instrument merely confirmed this in the minds of the students.

Whether the trials of life are “tests” or “affirmations” is ultimately known only to God and the individual who experiences these trials, but the point is that, deep within, each of us knows. As a teacher I had to have an objective score by which to assess my students’ progress which may not be available in this spiritual realm, but as the storms get stronger, the foundation will be revealed.

The Trust Fund

How great is your goodness, which you have stored up for those who fear you, which you bestow in the sight of men on those who take refuge in you (Ps 31:19).

                Unanswered prayer is the grief of many Christians today. There are usually no answers to the questions of “Why does He delay to answer me? Doesn’t He see how much I am suffering?”

                 As one who has wrestled with these questions many times, I have taken great comfort in Psalm 31:19. It seems that the Lord has a “savings account” of His goodness toward me that I will one day be able to cash in. Perhaps a better illustration would be a “trust fund,” because it is an account that cannot be drawn from whenever I would like. Someone else determines when I will receive it.

                 To access this “trust fund” of God’s goodness to me I must exercise the same kind of faith that a child with a financial trust fund would exercise. It is only a matter of time before I will receive my store of God’s blessing. I must trust that the Word of the One that is managing this fund is true. The only difference is that the time for me is uncertain while the child will know when his inheritance will be given to him.

                 While I am waiting for the display of His goodness the verse tells me the two things I must continue to do: fear Him and take refuge in Him. These are not passive, but active verbs. “Fear” carries the idea of seeking Him wholeheartedly, rather than in just a perfunctory way. “Taking refuge in Him” is an admission of our own weakness and inadequacy.

                 Some believe that this verse suggests that the display of God’s goodness to us will be apparent to all at the Judgment, but my opinion is that the phrase, “in the sight of men,” is that it will be here on earth, not just at a later time. David had earlier stated, “I am still confident of this: I will see the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living” (Ps 27:13).

                 The Lord has His goodness in store for those who trust Him. We don’t always understand why He tells us that we must wait, and it sometimes distresses us when people around us are looking for external evidence of His reality, but He has His purposes, and those purposes are perfect.

                 Spirit of God, descend upon my heart. Wean it from earth, through all its pulses move;

                Stoop to my weakness mighty as Thou art, And make me love Thee as I ought to love.

                Teach me to feel that Thou art always nigh; Teach me the struggles of the soul to bear:

                To check the rising doubt, the rebel sigh, Teach me the patience of unanswered prayer.

(George Croly, 1780-1860)