Don’t Forget Jesus

And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth (John 1:14, ESV).

It’s almost sacrilegious to say, but sometimes I find the Christmas season almost nauseating. It’s not that I don’t like the Christmas treats, and my wife is a great cook, along with all the others whose goodies I partake of. What I find nauseating is the endless repetition of the phrase, “the true meaning of Christmas,” when those spouting such drivel don’t know or won’t tell us what Christmas really does mean. My struggle is the willingness of men to focus on the trappings of Christmas while ignoring the Holiday.

It is NOT merely an opportunity to give gifts or do good to others. Don’t misunderstand — we are called upon to give and to do good for our fellow man, but that is true in every season of the year.

It is also NOT merely a chance to reflect upon how blessed we are. Yet during this season many people let these blessings proudly inflate their inner Scrooge by comparing themselves to the homeless or others in their family, or by how much they can deduct from their tax bill through end-of-the-year giving. Again, I say, there is nothing wrong with traditions of helping the less fortunate or visiting family or charitable giving. But these are not “the true meaning of Christmas.”

All of the things we will hear about the “true meaning of Christmas” are merely smoke and mirror devices used by the enemy of our souls to distract us from Jesus. In fact, some of the traditional religious institutions surrounding Christmas have become so familiar that we lose sight of Him.

The piety of Mary and Joseph that led the Lord to honor them by being the Messiah’s parents has given way to the idea that Christmas is now an occasion to provide for a homeless couple. No one denies the importance of helping the homeless, but that is not the lesson to be drawn from the narrative — it’s not “the true meaning of Christmas.”

The Christmas lights that used to remind us that Jesus is the light of the world are now the subject of TV special contests (complete with large financial prizes) to see who can create the most spectacular display. There are people who work year round to engineer these home decorations, without a thought (apparently) of Jesus. But we will hear them or some reporter explain that this is “the true meaning of Christmas.”

We could go on and on with the Christmas traditions that have been distorted to distract us from Jesus. The true meaning of Christmas involves Jesus’ willingness to lay aside the glory that was rightfully His to come to rescue mankind from sin. In that act He demonstrated the patient and giving nature of our Creator who fulfilled the plan that He had in mind from the moment Adam and Eve disobeyed in the Garden. That act also demonstrated the power of God to overcome the pride of men who falsely imagine that the world revolves around them. It’s not just a cliche — Jesus really is the reason for the season. Let us not forget Him.

Pompous Men


Man in his pomp will not remain; he is like the beasts that perish…Man in his pomp yet without understanding is like the beasts that perish (Ps. 49:12, 20).

The ancients have described pride as one of the seven deadly sins. That is exactly right, as the psalmist attests. Twice in this psalm, the author compares the proud man to the beasts that perish and are no longer remembered.

When an animal dies, if it is a pet, we are sad for a while but we will get over it. Animal life, though valuable as part of the created order, does not have the same value as human life which is created in God’s image. Despite the suggestion of Disney and other animators, the deer family doesn’t conduct a funeral for a member that becomes roadkill or a hunter’s summer sausage. No one typically mourns.

That same plight is the end of the proud and pompous man. He may have enough money to have a headstone erected with his name on it so that ancestry websites can trace his descendants, but within a few weeks after the funeral, he has become a distant memory. But the psalmist points out that his wealth will not endure. Neither will his reputation.

On the other hand, the Scripture is replete with references to how the man WITHOUT his pomp will endure. Dozens of times, in a variety of ways and contexts, the Lord calls upon his people to humble themselves. Repentant humility softens the Lord’s heart to the most incorrigible sinner (reflect upon 2 Chron 33:10-13). The problem with most of us, as the Psalmist notes, is that we are not willing to truly humble ourselves, and He isn’t going to play our game of faking it.

According to the Apostle Paul, Jesus’ humility was His signature characteristic, exemplified at the cross (see Philippians 2:5-11). We are called upon to be like Him, to set others before ourselves. It works every time it’s tried. Show me a home where husband and wife are more concerned for the welfare of the other than they are their own, and I will show you a peaceful home. Show me a church where the members are more concerned with prioritizing the needs of others and I will show you a peaceful church. Humility is the recipe for resolving every interpersonal conflict. (May I step on a few toes by saying, “Politicians should take note!”?)

True humility cannot be imposed upon us from the outside; it is a function of our relationship with Christ. Non-Christian religions (and even some so-called Christian groups) merely manage the pride of their members. Secularism hides pride in its promotion of self-esteem; Christian legalists appeal to pride to get their members to follow their rules; non-Christian religious groups and cults claim to be pleasing God when their members simply want to claim some proud righteousness for themselves.

Only Christ can make us truly humble. Only when we see ourselves with all of our imperfections in the light of His purity can we experience true humility. Jesus’ humility to the point of being our Substitute on the cross led God to exalt Him to the highest place and we are commanded to have the same attitude. When we follow this command, we will endure while the men with proud and pompous hearts will perish with no remembrance.

 

True Freedom

The words of the LORD are pure words, like silver refined in a furnace on the ground, purified seven times. You, O LORD, will keep them (Psalm 12:6-7, ESV)

The Reformation of the Sixteenth Century is the most significant historical event outside the pages of Scripture because it settled the question of the source of Truth. The Reformers understood that Truth is revealed in the Scripture rather than in the changing ideas of culture or the men who are the products of that culture. The very first question posed by Satan in the Garden of Eden was a question about the reliability of Revealed Truth (Gen 3:1). For the first millennium and a half following Christ, His followers recognized the Truth largely on the basis of the original teachings of the Apostles and those that followed immediately after. But by the time of the Reformation, the source of Truth had begun to erode. The traditions of the Church were taking precedence over Scripture just as they had in Jewish culture. Like the Jews, some of these traditions had no basis in Scripture itself and even contradicted it.

Those in our day that deny the objective nature of the revelation of Scripture suggest to us that God is shrouded in mystery. Nothing can be known about Him or about His will for men with certainty. We are left to ponder and wonder whether our understanding is right without any assurance that it is or it isn’t. They tell us that the historical writings we call “the Bible” certainly are one “witness” to God but cannot be considered reliable in an age 2-3 millennia removed from the time of their writing. Other religious teachings are similar “witnesses” even if they contradict ours because nothing can be known absolutely except what we can see or sense. Our senses tell us there is something outside of our realm of experience (hence, the various “witnesses”), but we cannot determine if our assessment of those sensory impressions is accurate because God has not clearly and absolutely revealed Himself.

In this society the warden of a prison reserves solitary confinement for his most incorrigible prisoner. He shuts him up and prevents any contact with the outside world. If the noise in the courtyard reaches his senses, he has to listen closely to determine if the noise suggests a riot (that might give him an opportunity for escape) or just an especially exuberant game of basketball, but he cannot know for sure because he can have no contact with the world beyond his cell. The purpose of this punishment is to break him, and it is usually effective.

Those in our world who deny that there is revealed Truth often try to suggest to us that God is a God of love, yet the circumstances that they have created by this denial of revealed truth parallel the circumstances given to the incorrigible prisoner as punishment. They are not the circumstances of one who is within the good graces of the warden. They like to tout how free they are to pursue truth, but it is a freedom within the confines of the cell created by unknowability. Nothing outside the bounds of the cell can be known; the “freedom” exists only within the closed system of the observable universe. Yet mankind intuitively knows that there is something outside. If he didn’t have this intuition, he wouldn’t be searching for the larger purpose or deeper meaning of life.

Solitary confinement affects the human psyche. Those that survive do so by adjusting their mindset; those that fail to adjust to this temporal reality ultimately go mad. We see the same phenomena in our world where men substitute very irrational theories to compensate for their rejection of revelation. Declaring the absurdity of “spontaneous generation” within the theory of evolution to be “rational” is just one example.

When the Reformers brought to light the authority of the Scripture over the changing opinions of men, they opened the door to a prison cell. Jesus had said, “You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free” (John 8:32). No intermediaries, theologian’s interpretations, or speculations were necessary; God has spoken! The source of Truth is established.