The Law Perishes

Disaster comes upon disaster; rumor follows rumor. They seek a vision from the prophet, while the law perishes from the priest and counsel from the elders (Ezekiel 7:26, ESV).

The Lord has clearly met me on a handful of occasions in my life. Usually they were epiphanies that caught me by surprise. On several other occasions I can honestly say that He clearly gave me instruction without any accompanying emotion. I am also old enough to recall times when I have asked Him questions about direction or other decisions that needed to be made and have just received silence. In those times I have yearned for those clear revelations from Him. I suspect that my experience is not isolated.

Ezekiel ministered to ancient Judah as they were preparing for (or perhaps already experiencing) the hardship of the Babylonian Captivity. Because of their idolatry and their failure to heed the warnings of God’s prophets down through the years, He brought judgment upon them in the form of Nebuchadnezzar and the dominion of the Babylonian Empire. When the king of Judah resisted Nebuchadnezzar, the Jewish people were carried off to Babylon for seventy years. That judgment ended the organized government of Israel/Judah (until AD 1948) but in God’s providence, and in keeping with His promise to King David centuries earlier, the ethnic connection continued until David’s heir — Jesus — could come as Messiah.

The precise fulfillment of hundreds of prophecies concerning Messiah is amazing, but not the point of this blog. The point of the blog is the mindset of the people of Judah as they were being warned of the impending judgment. According to the verse cited above, they were more concerned with getting an experience than they were with listening to and obeying the Law. Yet it was that Law that would help them avoid the judgment (see Deut 32:47); it was that same Law that would deliver them from the judgment once it came (Ps. 119:50); and it was that same Law that would give them the hope of God’s presence and His restorative grace in the midst of it (Ps 19:7). Sadly, though, “[it perished] from the priest and … the elders.” The religious leaders of the day didn’t teach it or heed it themselves.

Despite our marvelous technology, we are not different from the people of ancient Judah. Our world of convenience has trained us to expect drive through service from the Lord. We want the immediate gratification of an emotional experience without giving attention to the relationship He wants to establish with us as we meditate upon what He has already revealed in His Word. Ultimately, though, we know that He will require us to repent and change (just as He expected this from the ancient Judeans) and many of us would rather not. It would be so much easier to bask in the glow of an emotional experience than to dig out of Scripture what He has already revealed, especially when we expect to hear hard commands.

Christian orthodoxy has long taught that the canon of Scripture is closed. All that the Lord has intended to speak to us in this world has been given to us in the sixty-six books of the Old and New Testaments. We will delight to learn more in heaven, but for now, this revelation is sufficient. It’s a joy in this life, however, when He stoops to highlight a truth to us that He has told someone else in the Scripture. But He doesn’t have to stoop to our weakness in this way. if we would just read His Word, He will communicate regularly to us through it.

The Faith of Friends

“And when Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, ‘Son, your sins are forgiven’” (Mark 2:5, ESV).

This verse is part of the familiar story (told in three of the four Gospels), describing how four men brought a paralyzed man to Jesus for healing. The venue was crowded with hurting people, so they knew that their only hope was to remove the roof, thatched or tiled I assume, and to lower the man into Jesus’ presence.

At first glance it seems that Jesus connects our forgiveness to our faith and this seems right to us. But upon closer examination it is significant that He connects forgiveness (and in the end, the healing of the paralyzed man) to the faith of the friends that brought him to Jesus. All three versions of this story link the forgiveness and healing to the faith of the friends, not the faith of the needy man.

The primary purpose of the inclusion of this story in the Gospels is to point out the authority of Jesus to forgive sins which was a not-so-subtle claim to being God on Jesus’ part. The religious leaders present at the time would have understood this point (and so should we).

A secondary truth, however, is the dependence of us who are in need for friends who have faith. In the Lord’s grand design each of us, at one time or another, will be dependent upon the faith of one or more Christian friends when our faith is in a weakened state. Our faith in Christ’s presence and provision may be weakened by a constant barrage of problems or heartaches; it may be weakened by trouble caused by our own sin; it may be weakened by the encroachment of age or the oppression of our enemy. But what a joy it is to have friends who care enough for us to lay us in the presence of Jesus. Without these four men, this paralyzed man might never have been healed.

It is pure speculation, but I have often wondered how the healed paralytic changed after his healing, He would no longer have to beg or be dependent on his family; his gratitude to his friends must have been (pardon the pun) “through the roof”! People who have been so radically changed by Jesus typically are bold to introduce others to Him; perhaps this man brought other needy friends to Jesus or at least pointed them to Him. Just like his friends’ faith led to his healing, now his faith could encourage someone else, maybe even lead to their healing.

Let us also not imagine that this was the only time when this formerly paralyzed man would need the faith of his friends. In times of crisis we think that once we get through THIS one, we’ll be able to handle all others, but that is not usually the case. We have an ongoing need for a community of faithful friends.

Are there Christian friends in your circle going through tough times (maybe the needy one is you!)? How many have turned away from the faith or how many Christian couples have divorced for lack of a group of supportive friends to “hold the ropes” for them? Perhaps YOU could be that one faith-filled friend who takes the lead by organizing mutual friends to pray, or even fast, for someone who just doesn’t have the strength in himself to believe that Jesus can meet him in his desperate time of need.