Pompous Men


Man in his pomp will not remain; he is like the beasts that perish…Man in his pomp yet without understanding is like the beasts that perish (Ps. 49:12, 20).

The ancients have described pride as one of the seven deadly sins. That is exactly right, as the psalmist attests. Twice in this psalm, the author compares the proud man to the beasts that perish and are no longer remembered.

When an animal dies, if it is a pet, we are sad for a while but we will get over it. Animal life, though valuable as part of the created order, does not have the same value as human life which is created in God’s image. Despite the suggestion of Disney and other animators, the deer family doesn’t conduct a funeral for a member that becomes roadkill or a hunter’s summer sausage. No one typically mourns.

That same plight is the end of the proud and pompous man. He may have enough money to have a headstone erected with his name on it so that ancestry websites can trace his descendants, but within a few weeks after the funeral, he has become a distant memory. But the psalmist points out that his wealth will not endure. Neither will his reputation.

On the other hand, the Scripture is replete with references to how the man WITHOUT his pomp will endure. Dozens of times, in a variety of ways and contexts, the Lord calls upon his people to humble themselves. Repentant humility softens the Lord’s heart to the most incorrigible sinner (reflect upon 2 Chron 33:10-13). The problem with most of us, as the Psalmist notes, is that we are not willing to truly humble ourselves, and He isn’t going to play our game of faking it.

According to the Apostle Paul, Jesus’ humility was His signature characteristic, exemplified at the cross (see Philippians 2:5-11). We are called upon to be like Him, to set others before ourselves. It works every time it’s tried. Show me a home where husband and wife are more concerned for the welfare of the other than they are their own, and I will show you a peaceful home. Show me a church where the members are more concerned with prioritizing the needs of others and I will show you a peaceful church. Humility is the recipe for resolving every interpersonal conflict. (May I step on a few toes by saying, “Politicians should take note!”?)

True humility cannot be imposed upon us from the outside; it is a function of our relationship with Christ. Non-Christian religions (and even some so-called Christian groups) merely manage the pride of their members. Secularism hides pride in its promotion of self-esteem; Christian legalists appeal to pride to get their members to follow their rules; non-Christian religious groups and cults claim to be pleasing God when their members simply want to claim some proud righteousness for themselves.

Only Christ can make us truly humble. Only when we see ourselves with all of our imperfections in the light of His purity can we experience true humility. Jesus’ humility to the point of being our Substitute on the cross led God to exalt Him to the highest place and we are commanded to have the same attitude. When we follow this command, we will endure while the men with proud and pompous hearts will perish with no remembrance.

 

True Freedom

The words of the LORD are pure words, like silver refined in a furnace on the ground, purified seven times. You, O LORD, will keep them (Psalm 12:6-7, ESV)

The Reformation of the Sixteenth Century is the most significant historical event outside the pages of Scripture because it settled the question of the source of Truth. The Reformers understood that Truth is revealed in the Scripture rather than in the changing ideas of culture or the men who are the products of that culture. The very first question posed by Satan in the Garden of Eden was a question about the reliability of Revealed Truth (Gen 3:1). For the first millennium and a half following Christ, His followers recognized the Truth largely on the basis of the original teachings of the Apostles and those that followed immediately after. But by the time of the Reformation, the source of Truth had begun to erode. The traditions of the Church were taking precedence over Scripture just as they had in Jewish culture. Like the Jews, some of these traditions had no basis in Scripture itself and even contradicted it.

Those in our day that deny the objective nature of the revelation of Scripture suggest to us that God is shrouded in mystery. Nothing can be known about Him or about His will for men with certainty. We are left to ponder and wonder whether our understanding is right without any assurance that it is or it isn’t. They tell us that the historical writings we call “the Bible” certainly are one “witness” to God but cannot be considered reliable in an age 2-3 millennia removed from the time of their writing. Other religious teachings are similar “witnesses” even if they contradict ours because nothing can be known absolutely except what we can see or sense. Our senses tell us there is something outside of our realm of experience (hence, the various “witnesses”), but we cannot determine if our assessment of those sensory impressions is accurate because God has not clearly and absolutely revealed Himself.

In this society the warden of a prison reserves solitary confinement for his most incorrigible prisoner. He shuts him up and prevents any contact with the outside world. If the noise in the courtyard reaches his senses, he has to listen closely to determine if the noise suggests a riot (that might give him an opportunity for escape) or just an especially exuberant game of basketball, but he cannot know for sure because he can have no contact with the world beyond his cell. The purpose of this punishment is to break him, and it is usually effective.

Those in our world who deny that there is revealed Truth often try to suggest to us that God is a God of love, yet the circumstances that they have created by this denial of revealed truth parallel the circumstances given to the incorrigible prisoner as punishment. They are not the circumstances of one who is within the good graces of the warden. They like to tout how free they are to pursue truth, but it is a freedom within the confines of the cell created by unknowability. Nothing outside the bounds of the cell can be known; the “freedom” exists only within the closed system of the observable universe. Yet mankind intuitively knows that there is something outside. If he didn’t have this intuition, he wouldn’t be searching for the larger purpose or deeper meaning of life.

Solitary confinement affects the human psyche. Those that survive do so by adjusting their mindset; those that fail to adjust to this temporal reality ultimately go mad. We see the same phenomena in our world where men substitute very irrational theories to compensate for their rejection of revelation. Declaring the absurdity of “spontaneous generation” within the theory of evolution to be “rational” is just one example.

When the Reformers brought to light the authority of the Scripture over the changing opinions of men, they opened the door to a prison cell. Jesus had said, “You shall know the truth and the truth shall set you free” (John 8:32). No intermediaries, theologian’s interpretations, or speculations were necessary; God has spoken! The source of Truth is established.

Fake News…in the Church

Forever, O LORD, your word is firmly fixed in the heavens. (Psalm 119:89, ESV)

On October 31, 1517 Martin Luther nailed the famous 95 Theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany, Historians have marked this event as the beginning of a revival known as the Reformation. It is the most important event outside the pages of Scripture. Sadly, most people know very little about it or why it happened.

Social media today is filled with what Donald Trump calls “fake news.” It is usually disinformation that is intended to promote or destroy a political position. Since I have people among my Facebook “friends” on both sides of the current political fence, I often chortle at what people will believe, but it begs the question, “How do we know what is true?”

Fake news was Martin Luther’s struggle with the Roman Catholic Church in his day. Like so many political groups today who solicit funds from their political base, the Catholic Church in the sixteenth century was selling “indulgences” to their base. Buying these indulgences would supposedly shorten a deceased loved one’s time in purgatory according to the highest office of the church. But doing good works had never rid Luther of the nagging sense of guilt that afflicted his soul. It wasn’t until he recognized that real forgiveness was to be found in God’s grace, applied to him by Christ’s once-for-all sacrifice on the cross. Luther recognized the sale of indulgences (among other things) for what it was — an elaborate fund raising scheme that was duping innocent people into a false sense of security. So he objected by nailing his 95 Theses (grievances) on the door of the church.

This event was not well received by those in the church hierarchy, so Luther had to defend his objections, leading ultimately to the question of “How do we know what is true?” Interestingly, it is the same question raised by Trump’s term, “fake news.” Those who followed Luther’s lead recognized that truth is not a political position. It is not the “spin” determined by a body of human beings, even if they are church officials or people in power. Truth, for the Reformers, was objective and revealed by God in Scripture.

The Reformers were not monolithic. They had different approaches to a number of issues, but what they did agree on was the source of truth. In some relatively minor areas, they did disagree on what Scripture taught (hence, we have many Protestant denominations). But the final authority was Scripture, not the Church’s interpretation of Scripture.

In our day Protestants and Catholics still disagree on the source of truth, but now the disagreement is compounded because there is a large portion of the society that doubts the existence of truth. Postmodern relativism has created a world in which every statement is fake news to someone. Every statement is someone’s spin.

But the legacy of the Reformation — the reason that it is the most significant event outside the pages of Scripture — is that it identifies that truth is objective and then it defines its source — God Himself. In the words of King David, “Forever, O LORD, your word is firmly fixed in the heavens” (Psalm 119:89, ESV). Thank you for your courageous stand, Dr. Martin Luther. Thank you to the many other Reformers who were martyred for firmly standing for the truth. May many in this generation say with you, “Here I stand; I can do no other. God help me.”

The Last Commands

The last statements of both the Old and New Testaments are promises that God’s people draw great comfort from. In Malachi the last statement was a promise to send the forerunner to Messiah—a type of Elijah who would turn the hearts of families back to each other before the Lord comes. In Revelation the last statement is the promise that the Lord will come again.

Before each of these statements there is a command or a warning from which we deduce a command. These statements are strikingly similar: “OBEY THE SCRIPTURE!” (Mal 4:4) and “DON’T CHANGE A WORD OF SCRIPTURE!” (Rev. 22:18-19).

To many in Western Christianity today the Bible is just a book of proverbs and aphorisms. Its stories are metaphorical: David and Goliath is the story of every underdog; Daniel and the Lion’s Den describes every unjust persecution; the story of Ruth is the outline of every romance novel. To most today, they are not historical events but cleverly devised fables that must have had a tremendous press man.

When we divorce the Bible from its historical context, we do so both to our shame and to our peril. The last commands of both testaments remind us that the ignoring of the Scripture is a very present danger. It is to our shame because we have the history before us. For most of us the failure to understand what has happened in any historical setting is the failure of our choices. Late night comedians make much of the choices of many of our youth to understand pop culture over civics, geography, or history. Before we laugh too hard at our young friends who can’t explain the different contributions of Matin Luther and Martin Luther King, we need to be sure that we can distinguish between Joseph, the son Jacob, and Joseph, the husband of Mary.

Our failure to understand the history of the Scripture, however, is more important than merely avoiding embarrassment in Jeopardy—the Lord revealed Himself and His will through those historical events, writings, and pronouncements. To ignore them in favor of the latest sports statistics, movie trivia, or political controversy demonstrates our priorities. And the Lord takes notice. The Great Commandment calls upon us to love Him with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength, not our favorite sports team or pop musician. There is nothing wrong with following these entities, as long as we keep them in perspective.

The last commands of the Old and New Testaments to obey the Scripture strike a healthy sense of reverence (some call it fear) in the hearts of those that are truly Christ’s. They live their lives trying to please the One before Whom they will one day give an account rather than trying to make sure that people have the right impression of them. That’s why God warned His people through Isaiah, “‘Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool; what is the house that you would build for me, and what is the place of my rest? All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be,’ declares the LORD. ‘But this is the one to whom I will look (the NIV uses the word, esteem): he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word.’” (Isaiah 66:1-2, ESV).

Scripture . . . on Scripture

Your Word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path (Psalm 119:105)

Martin Luther led the Reformation to reclaim the Judeo-Christian Scriptures as the final authority in all matters of faith and practice. My life, also, has been transformed by the Scripture, but Luther and I are not alone. Consider how the great saints viewed the Word of God.

Moses’ last words of instruction to the Hebrew people were, “For it is no empty word for you, but your very life, and by this word you shall live long in the land that you are going over the Jordan to possess” (Deuteronomy 32:47, ESV).

Joshua’s first instructions from the Lord included, “This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success” (Joshua 1:8, ESV).

David wrote Psalm 19 to describe the two primary ways in which the Lord reveals Himself: natural revelation in creation and special revelation in the Law. That is where he says that the Law is “more to be desired than gold, even much fine gold” (10). Later he penned a literary masterpiece, Psalm 119, in which he creates an eight line stanza for each of the 22 letters of the Hebrew alphabet. Almost all of the 176 verses mention some important quality of the Law.

At the close of Isaiah’s prophecy, he quotes the Lord as saying essentially, “I am not impressed by what you can build or do for me; I am impressed by the one who trembles at My Word” (Is 66:1-2).

After the Exile, Ezra the scribe “set his heart to study the Law of the LORD, and to do it and to teach his statutes and rules in Israel” (Ezra 7:10 ESV). He would later make a covenant of obedience with those among the returning exiles who “trembled at the command of God” (10:3).

In a chapter describing the false prophets of his day who ignored the Law, Jeremiah quotes the Lord, “‘Is not my word like fire,’ declares the LORD, ‘and like a hammer that breaks the rock in pieces? Therefore, behold, I am against the prophets,’ declares the LORD, ‘who steal my words from one another. Behold, I am against the prophets,’ declares the LORD, ‘who use their tongues and declare, “declares the LORD.” Behold, I am against those who prophesy lying dreams,’ declares the LORD, ‘and who tell them and lead my people astray by their lies and their recklessness, when I did not send them or charge them. So they do not profit this people at all,’ declares the LORD.” (Jeremiah 23:29-32, ESV).

When Jesus began His ministry His first recorded sermon included those famous words, “For truly, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished. Therefore whoever relaxes one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever does them and teaches them will be called great in the kingdom of heaven” (Matthew 5:18-19, ESV). Then, on the night before His crucifixion, John quotes Jesus as saying, “Your Word is truth” (John 17:17, ESV).

Paul’s last letter declared, “All Scripture is breathed out by God . . . I charge you in the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who is to judge the living and the dead, and by his appearing and his kingdom: preach the word” (2 Tim 3:16-4:2).

Peter also identified the Scripture as of divine origin when he wrote, “men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit” (2 Peter 1:21, ESV).

There are other people in biblical history that were transformed by the Word of God (consider kings Hezekiah and Josiah). Like these people the re-discovery of the Word by Martin Luther and the Reformers was what changed the world 500 years ago; real revival will only happen when the Church today does the same.

The Significance of the Reformation

The Significance of the Reformation

The unfolding of your words gives light; it imparts understanding to the simple. (Psalm 119:130, ESV)

Five hundred years ago this month, an event took place that changed my life. No, I am not that old — despite what my kids think.

In October, 1517 an Augustinian monk nailed a list of grievances to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenburg, Germany and ignited a revival that historians have called the Reformation. Martin Luther’s issue ultimately was quite simple: The Judeo-Christian Scripture is the final authority in the world. Certainly many other ideas have spun off of that one, but this is the root which became the foundation of our civilization.

I was a naive, confused college student (interestingly, at a Lutheran liberal arts college) when I was first confronted with this idea, but not in the way you might think. Instead of promoting Luther’s idea, the faculty of my college had bought into the notion that to believe the Scripture was the height of ignorance. Only a fool would believe that Moses walked through the Red Sea on dry ground, that Jonah could survive three days in the belly of a fish, or that Jesus could walk out of His grave. I can only imagine what Luther himself might think about those who identified themselves with his name!

The fervor with which the faculty at my school repudiated the Bible’s authority made me wonder “Why?” If this book were just an anthology of myths and legends, why are there whole courses at this and other colleges describing why we should not believe it? Why are there endless books being written to explain away events that they tell us are comparable to Pecos Bill or Paul Bunyan? That fervor, rather than causing me to scoff at the fools who could believe such nonsense, drove me to it. I had to know whether it really was true or not.

That same issue — Truth — was behind Martin Luther’s stand against the excesses of the Roman Church. The circumstances he faced were different than mine, but the issue was the same, and that’s why that event changed my life. Yet I had more wrestling to do: What were the answers to the weighty questions that were raised by my professors? How can I reconcile seemingly unbelievable events with the modern world? As I pursued the Truth, those answers slowly came.

About this time I heard a noted (evangelical) theologian say, “The Scripture is God’s revelation of Himself and His will to men.” Although some of the answers were still fuzzy in my mind, it occurred to me that, if this man were correct, nothing was more important than finding out about Him. So I began a practice of reading through the Bible annually, which has continued to this day, and I intend to keep doing it until the day I die. At first I didn’t understand a lot of the history I was reading; I certainly didn’t understand many of the rules the Lord imposed upon His people, but it was His revelation of Himself. Through it I came to know Him. Slowly I began to make sense of the world around me.

David understood what I experienced when he wrote, “The unfolding of Your Word gives light” (Ps 119:130). Truth is not usually a lightning flash and boom of thunder (it can be, read Psalm 29). It is a methodical unfolding of His Truth. Sometimes, as with Martin Luther, it compels us to take a stand, but the courage to do so happens in the quiet moments as He reveals Himself.

The Lord Is My Portion

I cry to you, O LORD; I say, “You are my refuge, my portion in the land of the living” (Psalm 142:5, ESV).

The seventeenth century author, John Donne, wrote, “No man is an island…” His point was that every other human being enriches us and their loss diminishes us to some degree. Another way of saying this is that no one is sufficient in himself; we all seek some kind of refuge because ultimately we cannot stand alone.

The writer of this Psalm was David, long before he became king. He was running for his life and took shelter by hiding in a cave. This happened twice in the Scripture (I Sam 22 and 24). In the first incident, he was fleeing from the king of Gath; in the second he was fleeing from Saul. We cannot be sure which incident this arose from, but it is immaterial. David knew his resources were insufficient. The men that were with him were a comfort to him, I’m sure, but they were no match for the thousands that either enemy could bring against them. David felt overwhelmed; he needed a Refuge.

The Refuge he found was in the God of Israel. It wasn’t that he disdained or didn’t appreciate those that supported him; he just knew that if he were to be delivered, the God he worshiped would have to step in to do it. In both cave episodes, David sees a marvelous deliverance. The first was the provision of a pagan king who sheltered his parents; the second was the shame that Saul experienced when David could have killed him but did not. Other people surrounded David in both places, but his trust was in the God of Israel, not in human deliverance.

We in this generation have lost that spirit of genuine trust in God. The terms, “faith” and “trust,” are often interchangeable in the Scripture — trust is an active expression of faith. But our society has substituted a nebulous “belief” for active trust. Perhaps it’s because we have grown accustomed to having a safety net beneath us. If everything seems hopeless, our savings or our government or our family or someone else will step in and bail us out. David didn’t have the government as a safety net — indeed, it was the government that was pursuing him!

At least part of the reason we have lost that trust in God is that the government (or any other refuge) is gullible — we don’t have to be completely honest with them. We don’t have to admit our sins and our failures; we don’t have to declare our fears. In short, we don’t have to make ourselves vulnerable. But we do with the God of Israel. He expects humility and honesty when we come before Him, not excuses and justifications. He is certainly willing to forgive, but most of us fear that our deliverance will be conditioned upon some loss of face before others. That may be a legitimate fear; He may demand it. But the rewards for truly trusting Him are well worth any humility we might experience.

In another Psalm, David put it this way, “Some trust in chariots and some in horses, but we trust in the name of the LORD our God” (Psalm 20:7, ESV).

Like Christ in His Sufferings

“That I may know him and the power of his resurrection, and may share his sufferings, becoming like him in his death” (Philippians 3:10, ESV).

“O to be like Thee…” is the cry of an old hymn that is seldom sung any more. Yet it reflects the idea that the goal of the Christian life is “Christlikeness,” being like Jesus. Paul spoke of the intense longing he had that Christ “should be formed” in the Galatian believers (Gal. 4:19). The formation of Christ in the believer was so important to him that he likened this intense longing to childbirth. In Romans 8 Paul told his readers that God’s plan from the very beginning was that His people would be “conformed to the image of his Son” (29).

The old hymn (and most popular opinion) would have us believe that Christlikeness in the Christian makes us “full of compassion, loving, forgiving, tender and kind.” If we have been conformed to His image we are active in “helping the helpless, cheering the fainting, seeking the wandering sinner to find.”

Now I hope my readers understand that I agree with the sentiments of this great old hymn, but there is another side to Christlikeness that Thomas Chisholm doesn’t overtly address in his hymn — the sharing in His sufferings. Alongside compassion and forgiveness, Paul also rejoiced that he could suffer as Christ suffered (Phil 3:10), that he could “fill up what was lacking in Christ’s afflictions” (Col 1:24). It’s hard to imagine that Jesus’ sufferings lacked anything, but Paul seems clear that there is a certain amount of suffering that His followers would experience in this life.

Often when we think of Christ’s sufferings, we focus upon the “Passion Week” those six intense days that culminated in the physical pain of His crucifixion. But the Old Testament gives us some indication that there were other times when Messiah suffered mistreatment and misunderstanding, and that He felt these sufferings keenly. Several of the Psalms are recognized as Messianic Psalms and give us hints into the emotions our Lord experienced.

The disciples recognized the Messiah’s zeal for the house of God when He drove out the moneychangers (John 2:17). This reference comes from Psalm 69:9 and the succeeding phrases and verses describe the anguish of our Lord as He bore “the reproaches of those who reproach [God].” He “wept”; He “made sackcloth [His] clothing, [He] became a byword to them” and was “the talk of those who sit in the gate.”

I find it very comforting to see the expressions of how Messiah felt when His prayers seemed to fall on deaf ears (see Ps. 69:19-20, 29). The Father’s ears were not deaf, as we all know, but Messiah felt that they were, at least for a time — just as I do sometimes.

The Scripture speaks of the ebb and flow of life between suffering and comfort. Peter reminds us that “after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you” (1 Peter 5:10). Suffering is not permanent, even if it seems like it for a while. But it is a necessary component of being like Jesus.

Restore Us Again

Restore us again, O God of our salvation, and put away your indignation toward us! Will you be angry with us forever? Will you prolong your anger to all generations? Will you not revive us again, that your people may rejoice in you? Show us your steadfast love, O LORD, and grant us your salvation. Let me hear what God the LORD will speak, for he will speak peace to his people, to his saints; but let them not turn back to folly. Surely his salvation is near to those who fear him, that glory may dwell in our land (Psalm 85:4-9 ESV).

These days, whenever I see the word, “restore,” in the Scriptures, I take note. Our nation, which began well, has drifted further and further from the God of Israel. The drift has come to the point where many in our society deny the Christian roots of our nation. One political party even removed any reference to God from its platform a few years ago.

We are not the first nation to drift from the Truth. It has been a problem since the day that Joshua led Israel to conquer and settle the land Palestine. On numerous occasions in the book of Judges Israel drifted from the Lord, cried out to Him when their enemies humbled them by oppressing them, and the Lord delivered them. This pattern happened repeatedly throughout the 900 years when ancient Israel lived in the land of Palestine. Finally, after many warnings, God carried off half of the nation (the Northern Kingdom of Israel) by the hand of the Assyrians. Even then, the Southern Kingdom of Judah drifted away just 200 years later.

Yet God never gave up on His people. Just before Judah met its end in the Babylonian Captivity, Jeremiah the Prophet declared, “Thus says the LORD, who gives the sun for light by day and the fixed order of the moon and the stars for light by night, who stirs up the sea so that its waves roar— the LORD of hosts is his name: ‘If this fixed order departs from before me, declares the LORD, then shall the offspring of Israel cease from being a nation before me forever’” (Jeremiah 31:35-36 ESV).

The United States of America cannot claim the promise that God gave to His ancient people, but individuals who are His can be secure in His promises. Yet many of us long for the preservation of our Christian heritage here in America so that our children and grandchildren will have the same opportunities to prosper and know Him. But this will only happen if the Lord restores our land. Political solutions are insufficient.

The psalmist explained in this passage what God’s people need to do if we would see the Lord restore our land — “hear what God the LORD will speak,” and “let them not turn back to folly.” The Lord will not restore our land until and unless His people listen to what He is saying to us through His Word. He will also not restore our land until this nation turns away from its “folly,” those sins that we have condoned despite the clear dictates of the Scripture. This is called “repentance.”

The Issue in the Church Should Be Truth

“ . . . the church of the living God, the pillar and support of the truth” (1 Timothy 3:15)

I often listen to talk radio in my car — that probably puts me in a certain demographic! This morning as I was driving the hosts (one man and one woman) were discussing what they were looking for in a church. Throughout the conversation the qualities they looked for in a church typically began with the statement, “I want a church where I feel______” or “I feel a church should ______.” What was conspicuous by its absence was any mention of truth.

Admittedly I completed my drive before the conversation concluded, so truth may have been mentioned later, and I hope it was. However, what I did hear is quite typical of a postmodern society in which truth is marginalized in favor of feelings. 

 Postmodernism is a philosophy which has denied the existence of absolute truth, but it has become the prevalent worldview of many in our society. Words can mean what ever we want them to mean. For example, law can be twisted to imply intent when the text of the statute does not include it. The definition of marriage can be redefined to include homosexual unions when the writers of our laws never had this in mind.

When absolute truth is ruled out, the Scripture is no longer authoritative (identifying the insidious nature of this current philosophy). As a society we have called sin, “moral error” or “a mistake” or “estrangement,” all of which it is, but these terms serve to water down the concept. The use of the term, “mistake” or “error,” recalls a test in school where a single mistake did not constitute failure. Biblically speaking, however, sin condemns us to hell — any sin, no matter how small, no matter how few. And according to the Apostle Paul, “All have sinned” (Rom. 3:23). Likewise he said we were all “dead in our trespasses and sins” (Eph. 2:1). Only the Atonement of Jesus can deliver us, if we understand sin biblically; but if it has a different definition, many remedies can be considered to be correct (and many are in our world).

When absolute truth is ruled out, Paul’s description of the character of God, that He “desires all men to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth” (1 Tim 2:4), is meaningless. How can people come to know the truth when truth cannot be known?

When absolute truth is ruled out, “every man does what is right in his own eyes” (Judges 21:25). Solomon tells us in Proverbs that “There is a way which seems right to a man, But its end is the way of death” (14:12). Without truth, there is no measuring line. The prophet used the picture of a plumb line (Amos 7:7-8). Until we return to the position that the truth is more important than how we feel, that the church is the repository of truth, our nation will continue to languish and, ultimately, implode.

I have no problem with looking for a church that has compassion for the poor or prompts us to think about the troubled world in which we live or demonstrates that they care for our needs, but unless truth is the first quality that we seek, everything else will be a band aid solution for our fractured society.