Anchored By Scripture

See to it that no one misleads you (Matthew 24:4).

For false Christs and false prophets will arise and will show great signs and wonders, so as to mislead, if possible, even the elect (Matthew 24:24).

The days before the return of Christ will be marked by deception. Jesus predicted it in the verses above; Paul predicted it in II Timothy 4; Peter predicted it in II Peter 2; and though Jude doesn’t use the same language, he confirms the spirit of the age.

Most Bible scholars believe we are living close to the return of Christ; I agree, but not always for the same reasons. I suggest that we are living in the last days because of the deception that is happening around us and sometimes in us.

If we limited our evidence to the political world, there would be enough duplicity to convince the most pollyannaish among us, but the evidence goes far beyond politics. Many are duped today into believing the lies of the cults simply because their lives seem so morally pure; others are taken in with promises of health and wealth; and others imagine that joining a cause will bring fulfillment in this life and sexual ecstasy in the next.

Several years ago I enjoyed fishing with my father-in-law in his old boat on a small lake near his home. To the naked eye the lake didn’t appear to have any current, but I discovered quickly that unless we dropped his homemade anchor (an old coffee can filled with cement and an eye hook), we would soon be a good distance from where we suspected the fish were.

For a variety of reasons, our society is adrift without an anchor, and therefore ripe for the deception that marks the end times. The deception actually has been around since Jesus ascended; what’s different is that we have turned away from the anchor — the Bible.

Some of us have been shamed into disbelieving the Bible. We have listened to the scornful, seemingly superior, “wisdom” of those who have more education than we have. They have spouted objections that we can’t answer, making us think that there are no answers.

Others of us have rejected the Bible because some in our circles seem to have reduced the Scripture to a few disjointed and inconsistent rules in an attempt to preserve the past. We wonder why they believe that the God that created us and gave us the ability to communicate is stuck in the seventeenth century expressions of Shakespeare. We had trouble enough deciphering his meaning in our high school English class. Why do some Christians insist that He still communicates in that way?

Jesus told us that the truth would set us free (John 8:32), so it seems logical that we should pursue the truth. It doesn’t work, though, to pretend to pursue the truth while all we are really wanting to do is find a way to inflate our egos. The God that created us, who is able by His Word to judge the thoughts and intentions of our hearts, can see if we are pursuing the truth in integrity or if we have succumbed to the duplicity of our age.

The Anchor

Blessed is the one who reads the words of this prophecy, and blessed are those who hear it and take to heart what is written in it, because the time is near (Rev 1:3).

Theologians and Bible teachers have debated for centuries what “this prophecy” refers to. Does John promise blessing for reading the twenty-two chapters of the Book of Revelation or is the blessing for those who read the whole of the Scripture? We won’t resolve this debate in this blog, but we will testify to the blessing that reading either this book or the whole of the Scripture brings.

For more than 30 years I have been committed to reading the Bible, cover to cover, each year. It started with merely reading five minutes a day. My reasoning went something like this, “If God created me and has a purpose for my life, should I not set apart – at a minimum – five minutes each day to listen to Him?” Certainly He deserves much more than a mere five minutes, but since I could not predict how my life would go and what demands would be placed upon it over the course of time, I vowed only to this small amount. Still, that vow has kept me in the Scripture daily – usually for more than five minutes. On the rare occasion when I have failed, I have been conscious that the Holy Spirit has awakened me – sometimes from a very deep sleep – and has prompted me to fulfill my vow.

This vow to read the Word has created stability in my life like nothing else could. It has comforted me in trying times; it has reminded me of the Source of every blessing when times have been good, keeping me from thinking too highly of myself. When the world around me has been uncertain, whether due to politics, economics or personal loss, the Word has brought assurance that it will remain and that He is my refuge.

This vow has also brought real direction to me over the years. It has been – in the words of David – “a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (Ps. 119:105). There have been many times when my daily reading schedule has brought me to a passage of Scripture that was clear direction for that moment, if not that day. Most of these have not been profound, out-of-body experiences, but the quiet confidence that I had heard from God.

Whether you regularly read all sixty-six books or just the last one, John’s promise is true – you will be blessed. Nothing can be an anchor to our lives like reading this Book.