Forgetfulness

When I fed them, they were satisfied; when they were satisfied, they became proud; then they forgot me (Hos 13:6).

Even though God was referring to Israel when He spoke to Hosea, He may have used the exact same words to describe the current generation in America. Ancient Israel’s history was sprinkled liberally with special provisions of God for this people: the parting of the Red Sea, manna in the wilderness, water from the rock, the conquest of Canaan under Joshua, Gideon’s miraculous victory over the Midianites, to name just a few.

So with our American history. In their excellent book, The Light and the Glory, David Manuel and Peter Marshall chronicle many of the clear provisions of God in the establishment of our country, provisions that only the hardest of heart could deny being an intervention of God Himself.

For a number of years both of these nations – Israel and America – enjoyed the clear blessing of God. Neither was perfect in its worship and practices, but as a whole, the people (often responding to the national leadership) embraced the God of Israel as their Creator and Redeemer.

But there came a time when Israel forgot Him and His deliverances. As Hosea said, “they were satisfied,” and the satisfaction begat pride – they thought they deserved His blessings. When He began to remove a few of the blessings to make the people remember that they had no real claim to them – they were all gifts – the people got angry with Him (He was acting like any good parent would). So He sent His prophets to warn them. Some repented, but it just made others angrier. After repeated warnings, He finally sent judgment – for Hosea’s Northern Kingdom of Israel, it was from the Assyrian Empire. About 150 years later, the Southern Kingdom of Judah ignored the warnings and was carried to Babylon.

We have entered that era of forgetfulness in America. Among others, God has sent us DL Moody (with his musical partner, Ira Sankey) and when they passed, Billy Sunday and Homer Rodeheaver tried to stir this country to repentance. In recent years the baton has been passed to Billy Graham and Cliff Barrows. But with each succeeding generation, the number of people willing to listen to their calls for repentance decreases.

Israel’s history from inception to captivity lasted about 600-700 years, but we should expect God to be more patient with Israel. After all, He specifically called them His “chosen people.” The United States of America has never been called that (at least not by God).

How long do we have before judgment comes? That’s up to us. How long will we wait before we choose to repent?  Some people think (to their shame), “Perhaps we won’t have to repent if the right person gets elected in the next election.” But our hope is not a political one; it wasn’t for Israel and it won’t be for us. How quickly we forget!

A Question of Eternal Significance

Although I normally begin my blog with the verse or two that prompts my thoughts, today the passage is actually a couple of chapters in the Old Testament book of Daniel. Please look them up.

Chapter 2 describes a dream that the Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar had one evening. Like many of us he woke up knowing that he had dreamed something but couldn’t remember what it was. Unlike most of us he recognized it as something quite significant. When his counselors couldn’t tell him the dream and its interpretation, Daniel  was called and, after prayer, God revealed the dream to him so he could interpret it for the king. In chapters 7-8 of Daniel’s prophecy, we get another picture of the same dream/vision.

What is significant about this dream is that it is prophetic, and the details are astounding. The veracity of those details are now a part of our historical record. Daniel wrote this in the sixth century, BC sometime before the fall of the Medo-Persian Empire. But Daniel not only predicted that the Greek leader, Alexander the Great, would defeat the Persians, but also that his kingdom would be divided into four parts, that one part would persecute the Jews, and that the whole would be later conquered by the Romans, during which time Messiah would come.

Rationalist philosophies down through the years have disdained predictive prophecy, but they have always been baffled by Daniel’s (and Nebuchadnezzar’s) peek into the future. It really places them between the proverbial “rock and hard place”: either deny the obvious (that Daniel had some foreknowledge which can only be attributed to a Being outside human experience) or scrap the philosophical position that they are using to deny the Truth.

Because of the constant denial of the Judeo-Christian Scriptures as authoritative, many people today have not wrestled with this conundrum. Sadly, their souls will be, in part, the responsibility of those so-called Christian scholars and leaders who have decided that they will pass judgment on the Scripture rather than submitting to the Scripture themselves.

But the larger part of the responsibility will be their own. Each of us (at least in this society) has the witness of creation and the Scripture available to us. It won’t be a valid excuse to simply say, “I was too busy standing in line for three days waiting for the latest iphone to be sold, so I didn’t have time to check to see if the Scriptures were really true.”

The conundrum of whether to believe and obey the Scriptures or find an excuse to justify their rejection is one each of us has to face – even if we didn’t spend days waiting for the latest technology. On the answer to that question rests your eternity.

Weighed In the Scales

You have been weighed on the scales and found wanting (Dan 5:27).

I consider this to be one of the most tragic verses in all of the Scripture.

Belshazzar the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar was the co-regent of Babylon when this event took place. His father, Nabonidus ruled with him and was away from Babylon when Belshazzar decided to throw a party. At this party he thought it would be great fun to mock the Jews in his kingdom by using the fancy goblets that had been brought from the Temple before it had been destroyed. With these he toasted the wooden and stone gods of Babylon, elevating them to a position above the God of the Jews. After all, since the Jews were subservient to the Babylonians, their God must be as well.

What Belshazzar forgot – but the text makes clear that he knew about – was that his grandfather had been banished to the open field for a period of time – likely 7 years – until he acknowledged that the God of the Jews was the true God. Maybe it would be better to say that Belshazzar “chose not to remember” this incident, because despite his knowledge he flaunted his gods and his power in the face of his Creator.

His feeling of invincibility was understandable. The Babylonian Empire was at its zenith. The city was impregnable, with a major river running through it to keep the people supplied with fresh water even if someone tried to lay siege to it. But what Belshazzar didn’t know was that while he and his friends were partying, the Medes had dammed up the river enough to allow their soldiers to wade into the city without the Babylonian guard becoming aware of it. Daniel’s prophecy that Belshazzar would be killed that night came true.

Sadly – on a smaller, less dramatic scale – the judgment pronounced against Belshazzar is continually being leveled against men in this generation every day. Despite all the evidences of His existence, His power and His sovereignty men flaunt the gods of their own making before Him, declaring them to be greater than He is. The same declaration of judgment is theirs: “You have been weighed in the scales and found wanting.”

But it doesn’t have to be. This same God that Daniel and his people worshiped has revealed Himself in Jesus, proving countless times that He was and is God in flesh who went to the cross for us and for our salvation. Because He has clothed us in His righteousness, when we are weighed in the scales, they are tipped in our favor. We are no longer “wanting.”

But there is no “in between.” Either a man is found “righteous” or found “wanting.” I hope you have made the right choice.