The Law Perishes

Disaster comes upon disaster; rumor follows rumor. They seek a vision from the prophet, while the law perishes from the priest and counsel from the elders (Ezekiel 7:26, ESV).

The Lord has clearly met me on a handful of occasions in my life. Usually they were epiphanies that caught me by surprise. On several other occasions I can honestly say that He clearly gave me instruction without any accompanying emotion. I am also old enough to recall times when I have asked Him questions about direction or other decisions that needed to be made and have just received silence. In those times I have yearned for those clear revelations from Him. I suspect that my experience is not isolated.

Ezekiel ministered to ancient Judah as they were preparing for (or perhaps already experiencing) the hardship of the Babylonian Captivity. Because of their idolatry and their failure to heed the warnings of God’s prophets down through the years, He brought judgment upon them in the form of Nebuchadnezzar and the dominion of the Babylonian Empire. When the king of Judah resisted Nebuchadnezzar, the Jewish people were carried off to Babylon for seventy years. That judgment ended the organized government of Israel/Judah (until AD 1948) but in God’s providence, and in keeping with His promise to King David centuries earlier, the ethnic connection continued until David’s heir — Jesus — could come as Messiah.

The precise fulfillment of hundreds of prophecies concerning Messiah is amazing, but not the point of this blog. The point of the blog is the mindset of the people of Judah as they were being warned of the impending judgment. According to the verse cited above, they were more concerned with getting an experience than they were with listening to and obeying the Law. Yet it was that Law that would help them avoid the judgment (see Deut 32:47); it was that same Law that would deliver them from the judgment once it came (Ps. 119:50); and it was that same Law that would give them the hope of God’s presence and His restorative grace in the midst of it (Ps 19:7). Sadly, though, “[it perished] from the priest and … the elders.” The religious leaders of the day didn’t teach it or heed it themselves.

Despite our marvelous technology, we are not different from the people of ancient Judah. Our world of convenience has trained us to expect drive through service from the Lord. We want the immediate gratification of an emotional experience without giving attention to the relationship He wants to establish with us as we meditate upon what He has already revealed in His Word. Ultimately, though, we know that He will require us to repent and change (just as He expected this from the ancient Judeans) and many of us would rather not. It would be so much easier to bask in the glow of an emotional experience than to dig out of Scripture what He has already revealed, especially when we expect to hear hard commands.

Christian orthodoxy has long taught that the canon of Scripture is closed. All that the Lord has intended to speak to us in this world has been given to us in the sixty-six books of the Old and New Testaments. We will delight to learn more in heaven, but for now, this revelation is sufficient. It’s a joy in this life, however, when He stoops to highlight a truth to us that He has told someone else in the Scripture. But He doesn’t have to stoop to our weakness in this way. if we would just read His Word, He will communicate regularly to us through it.

They Provoked God

And He said to me, “Son of man, do you see what they are doing — the utterly detestable things the house of Israel is doing here, things that will drive Me far from My sanctuary? But you will see things that are even more detestable” (Ezek 8:6).

             Ezekiel was a prophet to the exiles of Judah who had been carried off to Babylon. One day while he was in his house, and the elders of Judah were with him, God carried Ezekiel in a vision back to Jerusalem where He showed him the grievous practices of Judah that led to their captivity. God showed Ezekiel four such practices, which in His eyes were increasingly heinous. After each of the first three, He said that Ezekiel would see “even more detestable” sights.

            The first practice was the placement of an idol in the Temple itself. The Temple was dedicated to the exclusive worship of the God of Israel. It was bad when the people set up “high places” – sites of pagan worship in prominent locations – but it was worse when they brought it into the Temple itself. The second practice involved the religious leadership of the people of Judah who were themselves bowing down before idols and denying that God could see them. As if this weren’t bad enough, the women were mourning for the pagan god, Adonis, and giving themselves to prostitution – again, in the Temple itself! And finally, the leadership willfully snubbed the God of Israel by bowing to the sun while in the Temple of Jehovah.

            The American Church has little room to criticize these Jews. Mainline Christian denominations often see no distinction between the God revealed in Christ and the gods of other world religions. In fact, I have read of some of these denominations sponsoring conferences that promoted the worship of some of these pagan gods.

            I grew up in small town America where my family worshiped in a mainline church. When I was in junior high, our pastor at the time persuaded the governing body of the congregation to purchase a new cloth to cover the altar at the front of our sanctuary. Rather than a typical phrase such as “Holy, Holy, Holy” or a communion message like “This Do in Remembrance of Me” the cloth contained the words, “God is All” – a message that reflected the pantheistic theology of that pastor and of the whole denomination. To my knowledge, that cloth still remains on the altar at that church.

            The Bible declares that God has not changed; “[He] is the same yesterday and today and forever” (Heb 13:8). If it was detestable in Ezekiel’s time, it still is today.