Jesus, The Bread of Life

When a Jewish family prepares for Passover, they go through a very involved routine to rid their home of the yeast or leaven. Leaven (the Hebrew word is “chametz”) is considered a picture of sin and contamination, so their goal is to get rid of all of the chametz that is in their home during the Passover and Feast of Unleavened Bread – not just the packets of yeast that might have been purchased at the store. They search the house for anything that contains leaven, any bread, any cake or cookies. Many of the Jewish foods at the supermarket are marked as ready for Passover – they are without leaven.

This job of cleaning out the leaven is mostly Mom’s, but the Jewish dad participates also and, despite his disproportionate effort, he usually gets the credit. On the night before Passover Dad and a child go on the ceremonial search for the chametz. The child holds a candle while the father carries a feather, a wooden spoon and an old cloth napkin. Mom, who has done all the hard work, has left in a visible spot in the last room a few crumbs of leaven, so that their search would not be in vain. Dad then sweeps the few offensive crumbs into the spoon and wraps it – spoon and feather included – into the napkin. Then he declares, “Now I have rid my house of leaven.” The next morning he joins the other Jewish men at a ceremonial bonfire in which they burn their bundles of leaven. The thorough effort ought to be a picture of our effort to get rid of sin in our lives.

Actually both Testaments see leaven as a picture of sin. Jesus used its corrupting influence as a vivid picture of the hypocrisy of the Pharisees and Sadducees (Matt. 16:6). Similarly, Paul equated leaven with malice and wickedness while urging the Corinthians to “keep the festival (of Passover) with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth” (I Cor. 5:8).

The contaminating influence of sin is seen in the fact that when we begin to justify some known sin, it becomes easier then to justify another. There is a fascinating progression in I John 1:6-10 where John records that once we persist in lying to others, we then begin to believe the lie ourselves and finally we end up calling God a liar.

We’ve all seen this progression at work. A married man and a pretty co-worker strike up a friendship. It starts out innocently, but they become more and more attracted to each other. If anyone in the office questions them they get defensive (they lie to others). They justify lunch together all the while refusing to acknowledge the sinful feelings that are growing in them (they are lying to themselves). Finally they consummate the affair and defend their actions, calling God the liar for saying that something as beautiful as their love for each other is sinful.

This is the contaminating influence of sin. The sin began way back in their minds, and that is where the battle could have been won. Certainly the immoral actions are sin, but so is the unwillingness to check the temptation. But it is interesting that this goes even deeper. When sin is not checked, we not only justify the actions connected with that sin, but the sin expands. Now instead of dealing with a covetous or lustful temptation, we have to deal with immorality, with lying and with idolatry. If you are keeping track of the Ten Commandments, the one sin has grown to four. The leaven is at work.

We cannot live sinless lives, as Jesus did, because we are steeped in sin from birth. But we can dispose of known sin, and the picture of the Jewish family going through the house prior to Passover is intended to
remind us of this. We are to be as diligent in searching our hearts for sin as the family is in searching their home for the leaven. David wrote, “Search me, O God and know my heart; try me and see if there be any hurtful way in me.” (Ps. 139: 23-24). The ancient rabbis have seen a relationship between this practice and Zeph. 1:12 where the Lord declares, “At that time I will search Jerusalem with lamps and punish those who are complacent, who are like wine left on its dregs who think, ‘The LORD will do nothing, either good or bad.’”

A calloused attitude toward sin was a serious offense in the ancient Jewish society. The failure to rid their homes of leaven led to exclusion from the community (Ex. 12:15, 19). Excommunication in ancient Israel was more severe than we perceive it to be in our society. To be cut off from the community meant that a man couldn’t trade or enjoy the protection of that community. He would be vulnerable to the attacks of enemies and wild animals. It was a real punishment. Today people perceive that there is no real consequence to sin beyond some personal grief. But this doesn’t mean that in God’s sight sin is any less severe.

The Church is to be a place where righteousness is promoted. Yes, we are to be a loving and caring community, but that doesn’t mean that we should be soft on sin.

At the same time, we should be conscious that every one of us has some skeleton in our closet. There are no perfect people; all of us are in some ways hypocrites. But the issue of personal holiness is not an issue of perfection. Mostly it is an issue of honesty. We are to be honest about our sin, especially as we speak to God. We are to align our lives with the Scripture, acknowledging that we aren’t perfect in this and confessing our failures. When we do this honestly, without pretense, we will find ourselves growing in holiness.
 The Unleavened Bread is a type of Christ, Jesus Himself having said, “I am the Bread of Life.”

The baker uses a fork to pierce the bread so that air bubbles don’t form. When the baked matzo is held up to the light you can see small holes in the cracker. It is pierced, just as was Jesus. The Bible says “He was pierced through for our transgressions” (Is. 53:5). Furthermore, when the bread bakes, the places between the holes get brown, producing a striped look. A phrase in that same verse is often translated, “By His stripes we are healed.” Jesus took that unleavened bread at the Passover meal in the Upper Room the night before He died and He broke it before them with the words, “This is My body” (Luke 21:19).

The contrast between leavened and unleavened bread is intended to point out the serious nature of sin. But often people today are not willing to assume the cost of their sin, so they put on a façade that suggests to people around them that they have repented, when they really haven’t. Real repentance always costs more than a feigned penitence.

It is also costly for the Jewish family to rid its home of leaven. It is amazing to observe all the foods containing leaven that we have in our homes that would have to be replaced after the celebration. The financial cost would be quite high, had not the rabbis come up with a remarkable solution.
 The Jewish mother still gathers up all the leaven in the home, but instead of putting it in the trash, she sells it to her Gentile neighbor for a dollar. Sometimes she puts it in a spare room/closet in her home and sells the whole room to her Gentile neighbor. But the point is that it is no longer her possession and she can honestly say that there is no leaven in her house. She is ready for Passover. After the Feast she then buys it back from her neighbor – hopefully for the same dollar – and everyone is satisfied.

Everyone, that is, except God. It is not enough for us to say that we are giving up sin when all the while we have intentionally just put it aside for a period of time. The picture of the Unleavened Bread at Passover is a picture of our being diligent to rid ourselves of sin, of trusting Jesus, the Living Bread, to cleanse our hearts and purify our minds. Let us do so with sincerity and truth.

Striking the Rock

8 “Take the rod; and you and your brother Aaron assemble the congregation and speak to the rock before their eyes, that it may yield its water. …11 Then Moses lifted up his hand and struck the rock twice with his rod; and water came forth abundantly, and the congregation and their beasts drank. 12 But the LORD said to Moses and Aaron, ” Because you have not believed Me, to treat Me as holy in the sight of the sons of Israel, therefore you shall not bring this assembly into the land which I have given them.” (Numbers 20:8-12, NASB, emphasis added)

It is a great temptation for believers to obey halfway — to give an appearance of obedience when, in fact, we are disobeying. As with Moses, there are always consequences to our disobedience.

The holiness of God demands our complete attention. Isaiah tells us that the person God esteems is the one who is “humble and contrite of spirit and who trembles at [His] Word” (Is. 66:2, NASB). It’s not enough to just hear God speak, we must pay attention to the details.

When I was probably 12 or 13, my mom sent me to the grocery store on my bicycle for some hamburger buns. I had only heard “buns” so brought back hot dog buns. Our burgers that evening had to be shaped long and thin to fit the bread!

Like most men I sometimes have trouble listening to the details of my wife’s instructions when something is needed from a store. Happily cell phones can now keep me out of trouble as I can call for clarification.

The busy world in which we live lures us into the same inattention to detail with God’s Word as I experienced as a young teen and still experience as a husband, yet — if He is really holy — there is no excuse for my failure to give Him my full attention. What distraction could possibly be as important as the Word of the eternal God? That’s why Isaiah trembled when God spoke (66:2).

But Moses’ inattention, however, wasn’t due to the busyness of his world — it was due to his anger. He was frustrated that the people he was leading were constantly complaining. Nothing was ever right with these people, and he had had enough. Sometimes our failure to obey completely is due to our own self-righteousness and sin, and this is far more serious than a mere distraction. Mis-shaped hamburgers are no big deal, but Moses was prevented from entering the Promised Land because of it.

Do you “tremble at [God’s] Word”? When He calls you to tithe, do you interpret this as merely “give’” and give a token amount? When He calls upon you to “renew your mind” (Rom. 12:2), do you listen to Christian music rather than turning it all off so you can read the Word? Are daily devotions a once-a-week event? “The LORD God of Israel declares…‘those who honor Me I will honor’” (1 Samuel 2:30, NASB).

The Sinless Savior

“BEHOLD, THE VIRGIN SHALL BE WITH CHILD, AND SHALL BEAR A SON, AND THEY SHALL CALL HIS NAME IMMANUEL,” which translated means, ” GOD WITH US” (Matthew 1:23).

In my last blog I wrote of the importance of this prophecy to the demonstration that Jesus was the Messiah for Matthew’s audience. Certainly that was an important reason for Matthew’s inclusion of this in his Gospel. But he had another reason: Only a sinless Savior could satisfy the wrath of God for our sins.

The holiness of God is largely misrepresented in our day. We understand that a God who is holy is not stained by sin or any form of impurity, but we ourselves are conceived in sin and surrounded by sin, so our understanding of purity is conditioned by it.

When Jesus was “transfigured” — when Peter, James, and John followed Him up the mountain and He was met by Moses and Elijah — Mark described His garments as being “radiant and exceedingly white, as no launderer on earth can whiten them” (Mark 9:3). There was a degree of “whiteness” that exceeded what could be accomplished by human effort.

The comparison of character with clothing is not exact, to be sure, but it illustrates that we live in an imperfect world — a world which sin affects more than we are usually conscious of. The Lord, however, is not stained in this way. His is a perfect purity, a purity that would be marred by the slightest suggestion of sin. Any sacrifice for sin, then, could not be stained with sin itself; it too would have to be pure.

So the virgin birth of Jesus is more than a fulfilled Messianic prophecy; it is a necessary condition for the atonement that Messiah was to have accomplished. Paul said it this way, “He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Corinthians 5:21).

Paul’s statement leads to another important reason for the virgin birth of Jesus: the restoration of righteousness. When Adam fell in the Garden of Eden, he could never be restored to his righteous standing. There would never be a time when he could go back to the same sinless purity that he and Eve enjoyed then. He could be forgiven, but he could never have the same relationship with God as he had before he was estranged from him. It is like a man who is forgiven by his wife after an extramarital affair; the memory of his waywardness never leaves their relationship.

 But because of the sinless character of our Savior, we who trust Him (including Adam and Eve, if they looked forward to the atonement of Christ) can be restored to that original righteousness. Our sins were imputed to Him when He died for us; His righteousness was imputed to us. Our relationship now is just as if we had never sinned. That is only possible if Jesus is born sinless, of a virgin.

They Provoked God

And He said to me, “Son of man, do you see what they are doing — the utterly detestable things the house of Israel is doing here, things that will drive Me far from My sanctuary? But you will see things that are even more detestable” (Ezek 8:6).

             Ezekiel was a prophet to the exiles of Judah who had been carried off to Babylon. One day while he was in his house, and the elders of Judah were with him, God carried Ezekiel in a vision back to Jerusalem where He showed him the grievous practices of Judah that led to their captivity. God showed Ezekiel four such practices, which in His eyes were increasingly heinous. After each of the first three, He said that Ezekiel would see “even more detestable” sights.

            The first practice was the placement of an idol in the Temple itself. The Temple was dedicated to the exclusive worship of the God of Israel. It was bad when the people set up “high places” – sites of pagan worship in prominent locations – but it was worse when they brought it into the Temple itself. The second practice involved the religious leadership of the people of Judah who were themselves bowing down before idols and denying that God could see them. As if this weren’t bad enough, the women were mourning for the pagan god, Adonis, and giving themselves to prostitution – again, in the Temple itself! And finally, the leadership willfully snubbed the God of Israel by bowing to the sun while in the Temple of Jehovah.

            The American Church has little room to criticize these Jews. Mainline Christian denominations often see no distinction between the God revealed in Christ and the gods of other world religions. In fact, I have read of some of these denominations sponsoring conferences that promoted the worship of some of these pagan gods.

            I grew up in small town America where my family worshiped in a mainline church. When I was in junior high, our pastor at the time persuaded the governing body of the congregation to purchase a new cloth to cover the altar at the front of our sanctuary. Rather than a typical phrase such as “Holy, Holy, Holy” or a communion message like “This Do in Remembrance of Me” the cloth contained the words, “God is All” – a message that reflected the pantheistic theology of that pastor and of the whole denomination. To my knowledge, that cloth still remains on the altar at that church.

            The Bible declares that God has not changed; “[He] is the same yesterday and today and forever” (Heb 13:8). If it was detestable in Ezekiel’s time, it still is today.