He Has Spoken

The LORD called Moses and spoke to him… (Leviticus 1:1, ESV).

Long ago, at many times and in many ways, God spoke to our fathers by the prophets, but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son… (Hebrews 1:1-2 ESV)

There is no more profound thought in all of the world than the idea that the living God has spoken to His creation. People of previous generations grasped the idea that if He truly has spoken, our job is to listen and obey.

It seems to me that the most important issue facing this generation is the question of whether we will believe that God has spoken, and, if He has, where that communication will be found.

Christian orthodoxy (that is, the teaching of the historic Christian faith) has held that He has spoken through the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments. The Westminster Confession of Faith (written in 1646) declares, “The whole counsel of God concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man’s salvation, faith and life, is either expressly set down in Scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from Scripture: unto which nothing at any time is to be added, whether by new revelations of the Spirit, or traditions of men” (I. vi.).

In recent years, though, the issue has been confused by those who have suggested that He has offered new revelation which has replaced the old. Our Muslim friends have suggested that Mohammed is a later (and therefore more authoritative) prophet than Jesus. They still claim Jesus was a prophet, but choose not to believe His claims to deity. Our Mormon friends have declared that the historic Christian faith has been trumped by the “new revelations” of an angel (Moroni) in the nineteenth century.

The latest confusion of the idea that God has spoken is the philosophy of Postmodernism which denies absolute truth. If there is no absolute truth, then the historic Christian understanding (at least as expressed above) is wrong. God may have spoken to Moses as recorded in Leviticus but times have changed and therefore His communication is irrelevant. If postmoderns are right, can we ever know anything for sure (including questions of right and wrong)?

Yet the people of this world crave certainty. Primetime TV is weighted with dramas that solve crimes through forensics, logic or law; there is a whole network that does nothing but show stories of the solving of crimes; other programs ask the audience to judge the guilt or innocence of a person after presenting the cases. For these, at least, justice is matter of right and wrong, of black and white.

This craving for certainty is a clear evidence to me that the postmodern philosophy is wrong. There is absolute truth; what God has spoken, He has spoken in space and time. Since He is God, that communication must have implications beyond the space-time moment in which it was uttered. This is one reason (there are several others) why I choose to believe the Scriptures. It is incomprehensible to me that God would give us a sense of justice and a desire to know Him without some certain revelation of Himself.