Truth Matters

…the church of the living God, the pillar and support of the truth (1 Timothy 3:15).

I have no greater joy than this, to hear of my children walking in the truth (3 John 4).

And the great dragon was thrown down, the serpent of old who is called the devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world (Revelation 12:9).

Many people begin their walk with Jesus by asking, “What can I do to get rid of this guilt?”; I began my walk with Christ by asking, “What is the Truth?” That, in itself, makes me weird. Over the years I have habitually capitalized Truth in my writings to distinguish between those principles we call “truths” and the objective, unchangeable Truth of Scripture against which everyone one of us will be judged.

Admittedly, when we pursue the Truth, we must come face to face with our true moral guilt before the God that created us. He revealed Himself finally and completely in Jesus who declared unequivocally, “I am…the Truth…” (John 14:6) and died to remove our true moral guilt.

Beyond this declaration of Jesus, both Paul (in I Timothy) and John (in 3 John) recognized the importance of Truth in their writings.

But Truth is under assault in our modern world. Postmodern philosophy has capitalized upon the relativism that had been slowly becoming more pervasive since the end of WWII. Our world has received a steady diet of challenges to our moral absolutes as television shows and movies create scenarios in our minds where those who have been traditionally “bad” are suddenly shown to be the morally “good” and sympathetic characters. In the past few years this has played out in real life on the streets of some of our major cities.

We are not going to solve the problems of race relations, police brutality and government overreach until we return to the Truth. One hundred and fifty years ago, churches believed and taught the Bible; today major denominations stand against the explicit teachings in it. Isaiah warned us, “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil” (5:20). One author has entitled his book, No Place for Truth, lamenting that modern churches have become bastions of pop psychology and “feel good” homilies, rather than places where Truth is declared.

Of course, these things should not be a surprise to anyone who truly does believe the Truth. The enemy of our souls has been called, “the father of lies,” (John 8:44) and “the one who deceives the whole world” (Rev. 12:9). He was the one whose first recorded words were, “Indeed, has God said…?”

The purpose of the Christian should be to align himself/herself with the Truth (and, yes, that begins with an admission of our true moral guilt and a confession of Christ); the purpose of the Church should be to strengthen and support that alignment through teaching the objective Truth, revealed in Jesus and the Scriptures — whether or not the crowds follow.