Their Hearts Burned

They asked each other, “Were not our hearts burning within us while he talked with us on the road and opened the Scriptures to us?” Luke 24:32

                 On the evening of the Resurrection of Jesus, as the word was beginning to circulate that something had happened to the body of Jesus, two men were walking along a road toward the town of Emmaus when they were joined by a stranger. It was Jesus, but they couldn’t recognize Him.

                 They were amazed that this Man seemed to not know the news that Jesus had been crucified, much less that He was reported to have been seen alive again. So Jesus explained to the men all that the Scriptures had to say about Himself “beginning with Moses and the Prophets” (Luke 24:27). Later, after He became known to them, they realized how His discourse had affected them.

                 The hearts of these men “burned” within them because they were searching for the Truth, and the Truth was being revealed to them. They didn’t have a flippant, fatalistic attitude that found expression in a phrase like “Oh well, it must not have been God’s will!” They were earnestly trying to make sense of the things that had happened and to see these events within the grander scheme of God’s redemptive plan. They were looking to know Truth. They would find it within the revelation of Scripture, explained by the One who embodied the Truth. What a privilege was theirs that makes many of us envious!

               Having known Christ in this culture for the past 35 years, I confess that I am cynical about how many people today are really searching for Truth. Many SAY they are, but the cares and comforts of this life are usually more important. It is unusual – but supremely joyful – these days to find a brother or sister whose greatest concern is simply to know Jesus and His Truth.

 

                But though I tend to be cynical today, I am confident that this tribe will increase in the next few years (if Jesus tarries). As the prosperity of our Western culture wanes, as people become disillusioned with the emptiness of materialism, there will be a hunger for the Word again in the hearts of men, because, as Augustine said, “Our hearts are restless until they find their rest in Thee.” Solomon’s statement in Ecclesiastes that God has placed “eternity in our hearts” implies that the things of this world will never truly satisfy. It may take some time for us to try “everything,” but once we do, the hunger in us for eternal Truth will burn. The junk food spiritual diet many today live on just won’t satisfy.

Hermeneutics

For I do not want you to be ignorant of the fact, brothers, that our forefathers were all under the cloud and that they all passed through the sea. They were all baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea. They all ate the same spiritual food and drank the same spiritual drink; for they drank from the spiritual rock that accompanied them, and that rock was Christ (1 Cor 10:1-4).

             A lot of people think the Bible is a “magical” book, a veritable fortune cookie that kicks out a wise platitude every time it’s opened. Nothing could be further from the Truth!

             One of the most important – but forgotten – courses in seminary is the one on hermeneutics, the science of interpretation. As Evangelicals we believe in the “Grammatical-Historical method,” that is, that the text of the various books of the Bible should be interpreted according to the standard rules of history and grammar.

             While there is a Divine component to the Scriptures, the various books were written by men who lived in space and time. Their writings reflect the history and culture of their day and it is impossible to interpret their writings correctly until we understand something of their circumstances. In those few places where the history and setting are obscured and unknowable, we assume that this will not inhibit a proper understanding of the passage, but for most of the Biblical writings, the context is apparent, or at least available to the reader.

             Likewise the biblical writers used the standard rules of grammar in their writings – subjects and predicates, nouns and verbs and adjectives – all of the parts of speech that we learned in Junior High/Middle School English. What is confusing to some is the fact that in certain places the writers of Scripture record obvious figures of speech, just as we speak and write in our world. The passage above is an example.

             How can we tell that Jesus intended His statement from the Sermon on the Mount that “if your right eye causes you to sin, gouge it out and throw it away” (Matt 5:29), to be a figure of speech and not taken literally? No one actually did it, even though they followed Jesus wholeheartedly. And there are many other examples…

             The point of this blog is that anyone that can read can understand the Bible. Children who are just learning some of these principles of reading may have some trouble in places, but there are still passages that can make sense to them. For most of us, though, the struggle is either a matter of taking time to do it and/or a background in which we have been taught that the Bible cannot be understood without someone interpreting it for us.

             But down through the centuries men have recognized that God desired His Word to be understood by the common, ordinary people. When the common language of the people was Greek, the Hebrew Scriptures were translated into that language – the Septuagint. When the common language became Latin, Jerome translated it into that language. It was called the “Vulgate” (from the Latin word for “common”). In England John Wycliffe and William Tyndale were persecuted because they dared to translate the Scriptures into the English language so the common people could read it, and in Germany Martin Luther translated it into German.

             The point? YOU CAN READ AND UNDERSTAND THE BIBLE – JUST DO IT!

Too Small a Thing

It is too small a thing for you to be my servant to restore the tribes of Jacob and bring back those of Israel I have kept. I will also make you a light for the Gentiles, that you may bring my salvation to the ends of the earth” (Is. 49:6).

 

            The last chapters of Isaiah’s prophecy are often seen as a Messianic prophecy of the “Suffering Servant.” This includes that wonderful passage that describes our Lord’s crucifixion in Isaiah 53. Here in this passage in the 49th chapter, God the Father describes the scope of the commission of His Servant, Jesus, to include the Gentile nations as well as the Jews.

 

            Despite the opinion of the Jews in the First Century, it was always God’s intent to bring all the nations of the world to Himself. Just in the last part of Isaiah, he mentioned God’s love for the “islands” at least a dozen times. This is in addition to the numerous references to “Gentiles,” the “nations” and the “ends of the earth.” It’s to His praise that the Church in the last century and a half has finally begun to reach these people that He has always desired to redeem.

 

            In Matthew 24:14, Jesus links His own return with the proclamation of the Gospel to all the nations, “This gospel of the kingdom will be preached in the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come.” Perhaps this is why my heart jumped when I heard a few months back that our missionaries had targeted a remote people group to whom they would take the Gospel. It was in one of the most remote areas of the globe and the thought occurred to me, “Maybe this is that last tribe that needs to hear!”

 

            As our local church prepares for our annual Missions Conference, it is my desire that the Lord will burden each of our hearts with some evangelistic ministry around the world. A few years back He led us to begin praying for a resistant group of people in Thailand, and today they are starting to awaken to His Truth. They are beginning to throw off the chains of idolatry and turn to Christ. May He be praised!

 

Motives

Therefore judge nothing before the appointed time; wait till the Lord comes. He will bring to light what is hidden in darkness and will expose the motives of men’s hearts. At that time each will receive his praise from God (1 Cor 4:5).

 In a performance driven world, most of us are used to being judged on the basis of our work. Business managers are concerned over the “bottom line”; salesmen, on the amount they sell; teachers, on the progress of their students; and factory workers, on the amount they produce. But Paul notes here that our judgment before God will be on the basis of our motives, not our works. The “why” of what we do is more important to God than the “what” or “how much” of what we do. Two men were standing in the Temple one day praying – they were both doing the same thing – but one man was boasting in his prayers while the other man was humbling himself. Jesus said that the humble man was the one who was justified, not the braggart.

 Many people serve in the Church in an attempt to impress God with their service or sacrifice, but He is not impressed. They haven’t sacrificed anything compared to Him. Other people think that their service should be enough to overcome any negatives that they have done – they are trying to earn His favor. Again, He is not impressed because nothing we do is enough to pay the penalty owed to an infinitely holy God.

 But when we “Love the Lord [our] God with all our heart…soul…mind…and strength” we do for Him out of a motive of gratitude, not obligation. When a spouse prepares meals (or any of the plethora of duties within a marriage) for his/her partner, it is not usually done out of a sense of duty or obligation, but a joyful service to the one he/she loves. So it should be with service to the God that created, redeemed and sustained us.

 When we fail our spouse in some way, the wounds he/she feels are not assuaged by gifts or sacrifices, they are healed to genuine repentance. It is no different with God. He is not interested in our self-abasement or sacrifice – He is interested in real repentance, in our broken and contrite hearts (Ps 51:17).

 

Lord, make my motive always one where Your reputation is more important than my own. Deliver me from trying to make my service somehow to be about me instead of You. Forgive any times I have tried to impress You with my sacrifices or my dedication. I give You permission to expose the real motive of my heart in any service I render. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

In Demonstration of the Spirit’s Power

My message and my preaching were not with wise and persuasive words, but with a demonstration of the Spirit’s power, so that your faith might not rest on men’s wisdom, but on God’s power (1 Cor 2:4-5).

             There are times when, despite my best efforts and thorough study, my delivery of the sermon just doesn’t go well. I feel out of synch and imagine that my hearers are having as much trouble following my thoughts as I am in communicating them. Recently when that happened, I was grateful that God answered my regular prayer that He would speak despite me. The responses I received were significant.

             The preacher is to be the Lord’s mouthpiece. In the tradition of the Old Testament prophets, the preacher is to declare with authority, “Thus says the Lord…” to this generation. We cannot do this unless we have an authoritative text from which we are working. I have often wondered how those who reject the Scriptures find something to say week after week. My words and ideas are not that wise, creative or important.

             But when that sure Word is clear from my study; when I have understood the text of Scripture and am prepared to apply its truth to this generation, it is terribly frustrating to come to that place in the service and be distracted either by my physical circumstances or by something external in the environment – like the air conditioning malfunctioning or the powerpoint presentation not working or some other distraction. It is in these times when I am reminded that this is a spiritual work, and that it is the Holy Spirit who is speaking, not me. No part of the Worship Service – if it is really a WORSHIP service – should be characterized as a performance, especially the sermon. I want people to think well of me because I want them to think well of my Savior, but like Paul, I want my people’s faith to rest upon God’s power not my “wise and persuasive words.”

They Provoked God

And He said to me, “Son of man, do you see what they are doing — the utterly detestable things the house of Israel is doing here, things that will drive Me far from My sanctuary? But you will see things that are even more detestable” (Ezek 8:6).

             Ezekiel was a prophet to the exiles of Judah who had been carried off to Babylon. One day while he was in his house, and the elders of Judah were with him, God carried Ezekiel in a vision back to Jerusalem where He showed him the grievous practices of Judah that led to their captivity. God showed Ezekiel four such practices, which in His eyes were increasingly heinous. After each of the first three, He said that Ezekiel would see “even more detestable” sights.

            The first practice was the placement of an idol in the Temple itself. The Temple was dedicated to the exclusive worship of the God of Israel. It was bad when the people set up “high places” – sites of pagan worship in prominent locations – but it was worse when they brought it into the Temple itself. The second practice involved the religious leadership of the people of Judah who were themselves bowing down before idols and denying that God could see them. As if this weren’t bad enough, the women were mourning for the pagan god, Adonis, and giving themselves to prostitution – again, in the Temple itself! And finally, the leadership willfully snubbed the God of Israel by bowing to the sun while in the Temple of Jehovah.

            The American Church has little room to criticize these Jews. Mainline Christian denominations often see no distinction between the God revealed in Christ and the gods of other world religions. In fact, I have read of some of these denominations sponsoring conferences that promoted the worship of some of these pagan gods.

            I grew up in small town America where my family worshiped in a mainline church. When I was in junior high, our pastor at the time persuaded the governing body of the congregation to purchase a new cloth to cover the altar at the front of our sanctuary. Rather than a typical phrase such as “Holy, Holy, Holy” or a communion message like “This Do in Remembrance of Me” the cloth contained the words, “God is All” – a message that reflected the pantheistic theology of that pastor and of the whole denomination. To my knowledge, that cloth still remains on the altar at that church.

            The Bible declares that God has not changed; “[He] is the same yesterday and today and forever” (Heb 13:8). If it was detestable in Ezekiel’s time, it still is today.

 

           

 

Trembling at the Word

This spring I have immersed myself in the Book. I have understood that the welfare of my family is somehow tied to how faithfully I adhere to the dictates of this Book. Admittedly there were some confusing parts, some passages that I didn’t understand but which applied to me and my family. I can’t say that I always applied those passages exactly in the right way, but I asked people that I trusted that did understand those passages and was able to correct the things that I had originally had mis-applied. The interpretations of those people I trusted – all professionals – didn’t always agree. There was some difference of opinion, but I had to finally interpret those passages as my conscience allowed me to, and if I am called to account for my interpretation, I won’t have to fumble around and point to someone else with the disclaimer, “It was their opinion…” I know my reasons for understanding and applying them as I did.

Every part of the Book had something for me, though not everything in every part. I admit to ignoring some parts that I didn’t understand but which didn’t apply to my situation anyway, but I at least skimmed over those sections to be sure nothing was pertinent to my life. Some parts I read multiple times and even found some of the same ideas in more than one place. I assumed that when that happened the authors did that to be sure I didn’t miss something important. I also noticed that the authors used different types of literary conventions in the Book, because it seemed that those different literary devices could more easily be understood.

In the end, I tried to be extremely careful that I did everything that the Book required of me, because I took seriously the warnings concerning penalties if I didn’t comply.

Oh, was I unclear? I was referring the IRS Instructions for the 1040 Tax Form. Did you think I was referring to a different Book?

This is the one I esteem: he who is humble and contrite in spirit, and trembles at my word (Is 66:2).

I tell you the truth, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished. Anyone who breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do the same will be called least in the kingdom of heaven, but whoever practices and teaches these commands will be called great in the kingdom of heaven (Matt 5:18-19).

Unwise Men from the East

You have abandoned your people, the house of Jacob. They are full of superstitions from the East; they practice divination like the Philistines and clasp hands with pagans (Is. 2:6).

As if God needed anything else to bring judgment, Isaiah identifies Eastern mysticism as one of the reasons for it. Since the 1960s America also has been filled with the influences of Eastern religions, some of which have come through the use of illegal drugs.  The series of movies known as “Star Wars” have introduced us here in the West to the Eastern idea that there are two equal “forces” at work in this world – one for good and one for evil. Yoga has become so common an exercise that many churches today sponsor classes, not to mention the Young Men’s CHRISTIAN Association (YMCA). This, despite the fact that it originated from and is an integral part of Hinduism. Some view the martial arts as merely a form of exercise, but it is clear that many others see a relationship between them and Eastern thought.

But these ideas stand opposed to the worship of the Triune God. People who practice the various Eastern religions in most cases set up shrines in their homes with gods of wood and stone, directly violating the commands to make no graven image and to have no other god but the Lord. The forces of good and evil are not equal in Christian thought – the Triune God is supreme and sovereign while the devil must seek His permission to afflict us (see Job 1:6). In addition, it is clear that the “Force” of Star Wars is just something to be used or manipulated while Christians are called to serve their God, not manipulate Him for their own ends.

Just as Eastern superstitions contributed to the judgment that God brought upon His people in ancient times, so it will contribute to judgment in our day as well. We in the West have drifted from the worship of the Triune God as revealed in our Scriptures and have set every other religious system on an equal footing. It is no wonder that the Lord who declared, “I am, and there is no other” (Is. 45:5) would be offended that we have entertained, and even set as equal, what is beneath Him. Truly we are worshiping “the creature rather than the Creator” (Rom. 1:25).

The call that Isaiah issued is the same for us – repentance. Nothing else will save us. The one He esteems is the one who is “humble, contrite and trembles at His Word” (66:2).

Weighed In the Scales

You have been weighed on the scales and found wanting (Dan 5:27).

I consider this to be one of the most tragic verses in all of the Scripture.

Belshazzar the grandson of Nebuchadnezzar was the co-regent of Babylon when this event took place. His father, Nabonidus ruled with him and was away from Babylon when Belshazzar decided to throw a party. At this party he thought it would be great fun to mock the Jews in his kingdom by using the fancy goblets that had been brought from the Temple before it had been destroyed. With these he toasted the wooden and stone gods of Babylon, elevating them to a position above the God of the Jews. After all, since the Jews were subservient to the Babylonians, their God must be as well.

What Belshazzar forgot – but the text makes clear that he knew about – was that his grandfather had been banished to the open field for a period of time – likely 7 years – until he acknowledged that the God of the Jews was the true God. Maybe it would be better to say that Belshazzar “chose not to remember” this incident, because despite his knowledge he flaunted his gods and his power in the face of his Creator.

His feeling of invincibility was understandable. The Babylonian Empire was at its zenith. The city was impregnable, with a major river running through it to keep the people supplied with fresh water even if someone tried to lay siege to it. But what Belshazzar didn’t know was that while he and his friends were partying, the Medes had dammed up the river enough to allow their soldiers to wade into the city without the Babylonian guard becoming aware of it. Daniel’s prophecy that Belshazzar would be killed that night came true.

Sadly – on a smaller, less dramatic scale – the judgment pronounced against Belshazzar is continually being leveled against men in this generation every day. Despite all the evidences of His existence, His power and His sovereignty men flaunt the gods of their own making before Him, declaring them to be greater than He is. The same declaration of judgment is theirs: “You have been weighed in the scales and found wanting.”

But it doesn’t have to be. This same God that Daniel and his people worshiped has revealed Himself in Jesus, proving countless times that He was and is God in flesh who went to the cross for us and for our salvation. Because He has clothed us in His righteousness, when we are weighed in the scales, they are tipped in our favor. We are no longer “wanting.”

But there is no “in between.” Either a man is found “righteous” or found “wanting.” I hope you have made the right choice.