The Last Commands

The last statements of both the Old and New Testaments are promises that God’s people draw great comfort from. In Malachi the last statement was a promise to send the forerunner to Messiah—a type of Elijah who would turn the hearts of families back to each other before the Lord comes. In Revelation the last statement is the promise that the Lord will come again.

Before each of these statements there is a command or a warning from which we deduce a command. These statements are strikingly similar: “OBEY THE SCRIPTURE!” (Mal 4:4) and “DON’T CHANGE A WORD OF SCRIPTURE!” (Rev. 22:18-19).

To many in Western Christianity today the Bible is just a book of proverbs and aphorisms. Its stories are metaphorical: David and Goliath is the story of every underdog; Daniel and the Lion’s Den describes every unjust persecution; the story of Ruth is the outline of every romance novel. To most today, they are not historical events but cleverly devised fables that must have had a tremendous press man.

When we divorce the Bible from its historical context, we do so both to our shame and to our peril. The last commands of both testaments remind us that the ignoring of the Scripture is a very present danger. It is to our shame because we have the history before us. For most of us the failure to understand what has happened in any historical setting is the failure of our choices. Late night comedians make much of the choices of many of our youth to understand pop culture over civics, geography, or history. Before we laugh too hard at our young friends who can’t explain the different contributions of Matin Luther and Martin Luther King, we need to be sure that we can distinguish between Joseph, the son Jacob, and Joseph, the husband of Mary.

Our failure to understand the history of the Scripture, however, is more important than merely avoiding embarrassment in Jeopardy—the Lord revealed Himself and His will through those historical events, writings, and pronouncements. To ignore them in favor of the latest sports statistics, movie trivia, or political controversy demonstrates our priorities. And the Lord takes notice. The Great Commandment calls upon us to love Him with all of our heart, soul, mind, and strength, not our favorite sports team or pop musician. There is nothing wrong with following these entities, as long as we keep them in perspective.

The last commands of the Old and New Testaments to obey the Scripture strike a healthy sense of reverence (some call it fear) in the hearts of those that are truly Christ’s. They live their lives trying to please the One before Whom they will one day give an account rather than trying to make sure that people have the right impression of them. That’s why God warned His people through Isaiah, “‘Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool; what is the house that you would build for me, and what is the place of my rest? All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be,’ declares the LORD. ‘But this is the one to whom I will look (the NIV uses the word, esteem): he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word.’” (Isaiah 66:1-2, ESV).

One thought on “The Last Commands

  1. Of course this is the last command in the Christian Old Testament. The Jewish Old Testament ends with 2 Chronicles (hence, Jesus’ comment about the murder of Zechariah between the altar and the temple.

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